roasted mushroom & cauliflower soup

It was time to get rid of the week old roasted veggies in my fridge and I was fighting off the urge to eat out. I don’t know why it is SO hard to cook for myself but it always has been this way. I far prefer a crowd around the table to the drudgery of preparing a solitary meal. It’s been an interesting exercise to think about new postings to add to my blog. I’ve actually been inspired to cook more, even for just moi! I think blogging food for me translates into a dinner party of sorts…Something I get to share with all of you guys if you were here with me right this minute. Even better, it would be great to hear back if anyone tries one of my recipes (I know it might actually be a stretch to call it a recipe) themselves…so please, send me updates if you have tried something or if you were inspired to change it up.

Another confession — I am a canned soup hater. I find few things less appetizing than Campbell’s Soup, yet homemade soup can be so healthy and delicious. As a kid I overdosed on canned and powdered chicken noodle soup. I supplemented my regular Kraft Dinner diet with these 2 items growing up. Nothing like multi-taking at an early age, when there was a ton of TV to be watched and only 45 min for lunch.

I will happily eat scratch soups and with the aid of purchased stocks it make the process super fast easy and delicious.

I gathered my mise en place. (my new to me fancy term I must start using for culinary school. It’s mandatory for me to get over my terrible french accent and expand my vocabulary)

5 minute soup- 4 smallish servings

  • Roasted (or fried) cauliflower and onions (approx. 1 -2 cups)
  • Roasted or friend mushrooms (approx. 1 c- leave aside a T for garnish)
  • 3 c of stock ( veggie, beef or chicken)
  • Blend (with blender or immersion blender) 2 c of stock with the veggies til smooth or desired consistency
  • Add into pot and heat–You can add the remainder of stock to make soup as thick or thin as you like.
  • Season to taste with Salt, pepper, 2-3 T of balsamic vinegar, 1 T of Horseradish if desired.
  • Serve with dollop of plain yogurt and tiny chives and a piece or two of mushroom on top

Of course this is not like baking a sponge cake– you can add or delete at whim. Just taste as you go along to make sure you get the proportions right for your taste buds. 

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apple pizza with avocado and pulled pork

I know it might sound really weird but I have to say this is an amazing marriage of flavours. I  am on a pizza binge as of late–because it is just so easy to pull together and I am trying to use up what I have purchased previously instead of buying stuff every night. This just happened to be what was hanging around my kitchen.

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  1. I  had a bag of dough left over from yesterday that I let rest on the counter to warm up.
  2. there was a HUGE avocado that I had picked up on the weekend and it was finally ready to use along with fresh cilantro that was on its last legs.
  3.  pork loin was thawing the fridge –still a bit frosty
  4. a couple of apples/pears were lying around just begging to be eaten
  5. My cheese choices included some old cheese strings, some paneer, and a small block of aged white cheddar. I opted for the cheddar.
  • First I slathered the skinny lean pork loin with EVOO, salt, pepper and grainy mustard – then roasted @ 450 degree F oven for 20 min…. end then I turned the  oven down to 300, placing foil around it  in order to keep it from drying. I added in some mango juice that was leftover in the fridge as well just to add a bit of flavour and moisture (but you can use apple juice, OJ or even just a bit of water).

When I was ready to do the pizza, I pulled out the heated stone ( i just keep it in the oven with the roasting pork) and placed the thin rolled out dough on it. At this point you should remove the PORK and let it rest and turn the oven to 400 Degrees again.

  • Back to the Pizza Dough: spread some EVOO , salt and pepper, thin layer of cheese, and thinly sliced apples THEN pop into oven again (on the bottom of the oven floor if you have a peel and stone)
  • Set timer for approx 10 min. Remove when crisp on bottom. You can broil the top a for a couple of minutes if the apples need browning up.

Remove from oven.

  • Separate the pork with 2 forks and add on top of apple pizza
  • Top with homemade Guacamole (fresh avocado, cilantro, finely chopped onion, lime zest and juice and salt and pepper to taste) or however you like your Guac.
  • Walnuts would also be a great addition to the pizza and add some extra texture and interest.

I dare you to try it!

 

hump day first week at culinary school

Ok, I admit it. Standing through an entire 3 hour class without leaning, slouching, no hands in pockets and ( WARNING TMI ALERT) oozing buckets of menstrual blood is not my idea of fun. Top it off I had a migraine most of the day; but I still loved my classes and the experience… but  I was very happy to head home on my scooter ( in the rain) by 4 o’clock… but “I digress” 

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First up was my baking class. I did not get to make cookies, or pie or anything. Instead we were tortured by the 2nd year students baking next door. The smells were amazing. I did however get to follow along with everyone as we were warned of the perils of the giant mixers, procedures, store rooms, honour codes, and keeping your sh*thole clean…according to my old German Chef instructor. He was amazing. My first 15 minutes of fame resulted from either being old, or smart…but I was the  only student in class who understood how to measure on a counterbalanced scale, meaning I got to tutor one half of the class while Chef helped the rest. I know it really does not sound like a blast, but it was! really …i swear it was.

The second class of the day was Intro to Fine Dining ( Service etc) and Wine ( last 7 weeks). I think I will stick with the under 19 set and smell intently and record other student’s impressions of the wine. Some of you may not know that one of my few claims to fame is that I have never had a drink in my life. It seems pointless to break a streak at this point. There will still be plenty to learn about grapes and regions and blah blah blah…and I am happy to soak it all in. I do have a bloodhound type nose so I should do just fine.

When I walked in the door I flaked out for an hour and still woke up with a headache. I resorted to my old favorite drug of choice, Imitrex and all is well.

topped with balsamic glaze
topped with balsamic glaze

Pizza tonight , using my NEW PIZZA PEEL. When I purchased school supplies yesterday I decided to splurge on the wood pizza peel . I needed to explore the bottom of the oven technique that Jules from Stone Soup recommended. It worked perfectly this time with NO BURNS. For $15 it was money well spent!

  • I made the dough up in the food processor first ( SEE TERRONI PIZZA POST or the STONE SOUP LINK above )
  • Turned oven on to preheat–tried 400 degrees this time
  •  fried up some onions in one pan and mushrooms in another on high heat.
  • Removed the HOT PIZZA STONE ( 400 Degree preheating) from the oven and placed the rolled out pizza dough on it.
  • Top bottom dough with a bit of EVOO.
  • Spread small amount of grated old white cheddar ( or whatever you have on hand) on the dough,
  • top with onions and mushrooms
  • sprinkle feta cheese on top. Season with pepper and salt if feta is not too salty.
  • Pop pizza in oven for approx 12 min. ( check )
  • If using the BOTTOM of the OVEN TECHNIQUE, remove pizza from the stone using the wooden peel
  • –or just remove from the rack
  • squeeze balsamic glaze over the top if desired.
  • MUSHROOMS are amazing when paired with a blue cheese or brie type as well. Just add on when you remove from the heat. The delicate cheese will melt and not burn off this way.

EAT

school dazed

This is DAY 2 of Culinary School . Last fall I applied to the Integrated Learning Program: Culinary Management H116 at George Brown College. Conveniently 10 minutes from my house in downtown Toronto, and ironically next door to my former long time employer’s (Simon and Schuster) newest office digs. I must confess that I am carefully containing my excitement. I’m not really sure where this all leads me but it is the perfect time to stretch myself and I am trying to let the world unfold as it should.  

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I’ve been purchasing and organizing all my equipment for class and I just picked up the most beautiful Japanese knife this afternoon. I am practically overflowing with giddiness. I’m also scrounging around the kitchen for anything that I can pack up so I don’t overflow with duplicates in my already overstuffed house… but happily there are still some mandatory indulgences that I can add to my stockpile. Yesterday was Kitchen Management class and Hospitality Math. Today was English class and I got to hand in my first essay on HOW I AM TOTALLY UN-COOL. Each class is at least 3 hours long and it’s been fun to meet my new class mates and get the scoop on everyone’s raison d’etre. So far every instructor has been exceptionally pleasant and impressive. This is a 2 year diploma and with around 30 to 60 (?-bad with estimating numbers in crowds) people each class with a fairly diverse age range–although I think I may be the 2nd oldest. One dude talked about cooking in the 70’s. I guess technically I ( and Juli) did a stint with crazy Mrs Dean in the Kootenay‘s in 1977, but that’s a whole other story.

Tomorrow will be my first time in the baking kitchen lab and I am definitely psyched!! I hope we make something other than cookies. I’ve been living on a steady diet of them for 2 days. BTW- I will be avoiding full body shots of my chef outfit until the time is right. Tomorrow is my first day wearing this charming outfit. For now, you’ll just have to imagine it.

Turning over a new leaf I plan to cook at home as much as possible. I did not plan well but luckily I had roasted cauliflower , onions and tomatoes on the weekend.

easy dinner with leftovers in fridge- roasted cauliflower soup
easy dinner with leftovers in fridge- roasted cauliflower soup

5 minute ROASTED CAULIFLOWER SOUP

  • Throw a bunch of cauliflower and onions into a blender with some cold chicken stock (measure carefully hah!)
  • Season with salt, lemon zest, horseradish and rooster sauce to taste
  • Blend till smooth

Heat on stove and then serve with:

  • a spoon of thick yogurt
  • roasted tomatoes /lemon squeeze /capers  and FRESH CILANTRO!

Of course season to your liking– if you prefer to mix it up a bit….

Cauliflower is pretty accommodating. The rich colour is really just a result of the roasting and a wee squirt of Hot Sauce.

PET PEEVE- stinky dishcloths!

There have been times in the recent past while grabbing for the dishcloth I was horrified to find that I was wiping the counter with something akin to a”stinky butt work sock”. Hoping to always avoid this unpleasantness I have employed these techniques:

  • washing the cloth daily (er, maybe every other day)
  • bleaching the cloth regularly ( bad and toxic!)
  • always making sure it is rinsed in HOT HOT WATER and spread to dry completely
  • I have adopted the cotton, granny knitted versions. (I don’t like to depend on disposable cloths, since I try to cut down waste and I indulge in paper towels for really nasty messes like pig’s blood seeping out meat trays, for instance.)

I admit, I have an “uber sensitive” nose, but I am certain I am not the only one who is assaulted by the  stench but curiously I end up being the only one who seems to do anything about it. (strike up the tiny violins)

Here is my ONE NO FAIL trick between washes and can be done several times a day…

NUKE the HECK OUT OF IT!

and IF IT DOES FAIL, throw the cloth out. Just send it packing to a landfill site somewhere near you.

I take the thoroughly rinsed cloth and soak it with water–then place in the microwave for min 5 min. I might even add more water and have another go at it.

When I remove the cloth–all the cooties are gone. Dead! …and it makes it very easy to wipe down the interior of the microwave at the same time with the steamy hot mess.

Sometimes I add some white vinegar to the whole process, and it makes the microwave even easier to wipe up.

In fact this works so well, that I can wear the cloth on my face!

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I would love to hear some of your KITCHEN TIPS. Send them along. I promise I will try them every legitimate one out ( thought I should give myself some kind of out–just in case there is a tip on how to make pigeon testicles palatable)

new old school popcorn secrets revealed!

I hate the smell of microwave popcorn. It reeks and it has the stench of a toxic dump when it’s burnt. That fake fat that swims in the bag makes me gag! Have I made it clear yet, how much I hate the stuff? …however, Ms. Madds loves popcorn. She’s a salty savoury kind of gal and so I tried out a new trick. Some of you may already know this but I am putting it out there now that I have tried it myself.

You can make popcorn in a BROWN PAPER LUNCH BAG – no fat, no salt, no additives, NO KIDDING….and best of all CHEAP! 

Here is a short modern history of popcorn as I see it:

In the old days (I have skipped over the jiffy-pop era of my childhood) we used oil in a saucepan, but after burning several good pots many of us moved on to AIR POPPERS.  When this bulky one purpose appliance started to spit out un-popped hot kernels that would crack your back teeth out of your skull, people  moved on to the microwave crap. I am not sure how many gazillions of dollars$$$ are spent on this junk but I would suggest we could clothe and feed the world’s poor on the excessive costs associated with the stuff, not to mention the costly strain it puts on our health care system.

Now that I am through with my badly researched and unsubstantiated history lesson let’s move on.

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Assemble your ingredients:

2 brown paper lunch bags, packing tape, popcorn kernels

  • Place 2 Tablespoons of the kernels in the bag.

I decided to try 2 bags inside each other and taped down the folded edge with the best tape on earth–CLEAR PACKING TAPE. Do not staple ( I am afraid of microwave lightning) but — skinny tape may work in a pinch.

TIP: When I folded the bottom of the bag over… it actually helped with the popping process. Take a page out of Orville Redenbacher method. (Curious as to whether Mr. R was still alive… I google him and found out he died in his jacuzzi. Sounds like not a bad way to go if you are 88.)

  • Set microwave to the POPCORN SENSOR or listen to for the popping to stop – 2 to 5 sec apart . Ere on the side of undercooked–as you do not want the burned stench to take over the house.

TIP: I culled out the old maids( un-popped kernels for a couple of bags) and placed them back in the bag once everything had cooled down somewhat and set the sensor one more time.

EAT PLAIN or melt a little REAL BUTTER or go crazy and make REAL CARAMEL POPCORN. You will never ever crave the commercial kind again. I promise.

CARAMEL POPCORN RECIPE:

  • 1/2 c butter
  • 1 c dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 c corn syrup  or honey or maple syrup ( to be really decadent)
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/2 t baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 5 c of popped popcorn in a roomy bowl. Make sure old maids ( un-popped kernels ) have been sifted out.
  • extra MIX-INS if you like–chocolate chips, nuts, coconut, gummy bears—the sky’s the limit)
  1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Stir in brown sugar,  syrup and salt. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil without stirring approx. 4 minutes.
  2. Remove from heat and stir in soda and vanilla. Mixture will foam up–I LOVE THIS!
  3. Pour over popcorn and mix gently to cover all the kernels.
  4. Add any mix ins or enjoy as is.

SPECIAL NOTE: DO NOT ADD ROSE WATER to the caramel syrup. For some reason, I did this once about 20 years ago. My kids have never forgiven me and it is one of those memories that will not die. I have no excuse for this grave error, except that I am extremely experimental. I think outside the box. Sometimes people get hurt in the process.

 

a crafty life…

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I love craft fairs. Ever since my mother brought home a melted LP festooned with plastic flowers and sprayed with gold paint, I have been awestruck by the wonder of it all. So many people gathered in one place to hawk their creations of love. For me, I  love the old school grammas who knit socks and mittens and I love the new generation of 20 -30 somethings that  are reinventing the world of crafts…like the one we attended today, City of Craft .

When I was a young mom, my sister-in-law Kim and I spent fashioning bread dough creatures into walnut shells to hang on Christmas trees. We became experts at assembly line construction. Everything was hand-painted then dipped in shellac and hung on a thin line to dry. My mother would take dozens of our NUT BABIES to the bank where she worked and flogged them for us. Without her, we would have been swimming in excess inventory. We cleverly tucked them inside of egg cartons and wrapped them in bows. The sales and marketing part of crafts is always the tricky part of the equation. We called ourselves the Domestic Engineers and still laugh at the hours of fun we had together with our little kids, creating along side of us.

If I were not so lazy I would dig some of these ancient things out of the basement boxes, but just in case you missed it the first go round, I am too lazy, and tired , and it’s late. Most of them have long crumbled away but there are a few sole survivors almost 30 years later.

I also have a number of my “home-made padded photograph binders” around the house that are worse for wear and the snapshots inside are melting away under the acidic sheets of clinging plastic and glue.

Long gone are the macrame plant holders of my youth and the wire-framed fabric flowers sitting in wicker baskets on the back of my toilet.

I used to walk around craft fairs thinking, I CAN DO THAT, I CAN DO THAT! Now , more than ever I am awestruck by the artistry, sophistication, creativity and sheer beauty of these crafter’s wares…but most of all, I love some of simpler creations that hold childlike wonder and love, and exclaim to the world, I AM MADE BY A HUMAN HAND !

SOME REAL LIFE EXAMPLES OF CRAFTING GONE WRONG OVER THE YEARS….

PADDED FABRIC  EXTRAVAGANZA


Fabric padded photo frame–made from the left over fabric of a baby dress I had sewn for my eldest daughter. If you look closely you can see the HAND SMOCKED dresses my girls were wearing. These are actually still beautiful items that have been passed down to their babies now.

Fabric photo/sticker albums

HAND MADE POTTERY– when I thought that I could throw pots like Demi Moore in Ghost and gave up and just fashioned things out of blobs with rolling pins and fingers.

THE NAKED MAN–aka, the reason I know longer delude myself into thinking that ONE DAY I will be a great painter….France 2007

me and Mark Bittman are peeps

I would like to think so but I flatter myself. He has inspired me for years now. I was delighted to see that my pizza post was right in sync with his NYTimes piece this week.

Check out his TED TALK too while you are at it.

HOW TO COOK EVERYTHING

For Chefs at Home, a Pie Above the Rest

Potato Pizza: Mark Bittman makes a simple pizza with potato and rosemary.

By 
Published: April 17, 2012

I’M here — back in the Dining section with a new column — to insist once again that not only can you cook it at home, but you can likely cook it better.

Talk Pizza With Bittman

Mark Bittman will host an hourlong chat this Wednesday at 3 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on The Times’s Facebook page, answering your questions on the ins and outs of making pizza.

Multimedia

Recipe

How to Cook Everything

Mark Bittman’s new column, How to Cook Everything, will appear every other week in the Dining section. He will continue to write for Opinion and the Sunday Magazine.

“It,” in this case, is pizza, and the impetus for today’s installment was a visit to a highly acclaimed pizza joint in Manhattan, where I was served (for $15, or about four times the cost of the ingredients in a supermarket) a perfectly ordinary, overly poofy, drearily sauced pizza. Granted, the mozzarella was first rate. Big deal.

This followed by a couple of days what has become a not-atypical dinner at my house, where I served a pizza bianca, lightly sprinkled with olive oil, salt and rosemary, and threw together a pie with a tomato sauce based on a slew of onions and a bit of guanciale (only because I happened to have some), along with a sufficient amount of grated Parmesan to make its presence known.

I won’t even get into the money-saving part; people who cook at home for economic reasons already know about that. I will say that my crust tasted better, and my pizza was more properly cooked (yes, that’s a matter of taste, but do you really want to eat a bialy with tomato and cheese, as seems to have become de rigueur?) and better sauced than the one I ate a few days later in Midtown.

Yours can be, too, and I know that because I’m not really that good at making pizza. In fact, two or three of my close friends do it better, and I know of others.

It’s about three things: some confidence, practice and a food processor. This piece is my attempt to instill you with the first, encourage you to get the second and implore you to use the third, though even that’s not necessary, since there is an alternative: the no-knead method popularized by Jim Lahey. I’ve gone back and forth between the two, but for ease, lack of mess and more-flexible timing, I’ve come to prefer the food processor. Still, make the dough however you like, because you won’t go wrong.

From the beginning, the food processor was justifiably promoted as a tool for making dough. (My longstanding guide for this, by the way, is “The Best Bread Ever,” by my friend Charles Van Over.)

I love it for pizza because you can make the dough in five minutes. (A video of this is here.) Although rushing isn’t ideal, you can start pressing or rolling out the pizza 20 minutes later. (Use the larger amount of yeast if you’re doing this.) Which means, in a pinch, start to finish in an hour.

What is ideal is letting the dough rest for a while in the refrigerator or even freezer, though for best quality not for more than a few days. The advantages of this technique, besides the obvious convenience (make the dough in the morning or up to a few days before, and just let it come to room temperature before proceeding), is that the dough matures, marginally improving its flavor and making it considerably easier to handle.

There are, of course, some fine points, but even here there’s flexibility. Should you roll the dough or pat it out? That’s your call. (If you pat it out, you can leave it thick and dimpled — use your fingertips — and call it focaccia.) Should you use a pizza peel and a stone? Well, yes, and if you preheat the stone for a good half-hour, the crust will crackle even more, but it isn’t essential. I didn’t have a peel for a couple of years (no room) and used a piece of plywood or a flexible cutting board. And if you don’t have a stone, a baking or cookie sheet will do fine; just use a little olive oil to keep the dough from sticking. This will give you a crisper crust, one sort of halfway to the fried dough Pete Wells writes about this week.

A whole-wheat crust? Sure, 50 percent; it won’t be as crisp or have the same “pull,” but it will have a deeper flavor and give you a warm, fuzzy feeling. (You can also integrate herbs, garlic, dried chiles, loads of black pepper, cornmeal, whatever, into the crust; the food processor makes this incredibly easy.) Extra-crisp crust with extra-moist topping? Prebake the crust about halfway, with just a bit of olive oil on top, then add everything else and return to the oven.

Mix the dough by hand? Yes, but you’re increasing your workload or, if you go for the no-knead method, your time. If your food processor isn’t big or powerful enough for the recipe here, halve the recipe or get a new food processor. Other uses for the dough? Fried pizza or calzone, both discussed elsewhere in this section; rolls or bread or even those silly garlic knots. But pizza is the highest and best use.

The options don’t stop, and we haven’t even started on toppings. When it comes to these, I’m pretty conservative, favoring the kind of treatments I mentioned earlier, or pizza with potatoes (a legitimate Roman favorite, obviously for carb lovers), eggplant or zucchini.

Others include the obvious, like tomato sauce of almost any type, with or without mozzarella and/or Parmesan; fresh tomatoes; pepperoni; anchovies; sausage (cooked or crumbled); chorizo or other cured meat; olives; onion cooked to any degree or not at all, with olive oil; pesto (or fresh basil); eggplant or zucchini, sautéed or grilled first, with or without cheese and/or tomatoes; seafood (raw clams, oysters, shrimp, scallops, lightly steamed mussels, lobster, whatever), preferably with garlic, oregano and oil.

I don’t wander far from those, which doesn’t mean you can’t. It’s all optional, and all good. Better, in fact.

A version of this article appeared in print on April 18, 2012, on page D1 of the New York edition with the headline: For Chefs at Home, A Pie Above the Rest.

a weekend with Ms. Madds

This weekend, I had a 2 1/2 year old to myself– 4 days and 3 nights. As I write her mother is spending her last evening in NYC celebrating the completion of her undergrad degree. This is a big deal for Maddie to be without her mommy overnight, but we seem to be having a good time in spite of it all.

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Friday night we heard the familiar music of the ice-cream truck. When my kids were little I  used to curse the guy that would drive into our townhouse complex nightly. I felt like a meanie, as I rarely had any spare dollars to spend on frozen rockets and overpriced ice-cream. Well guess what? Somehow I have the $ now to buy ice-cream almost as large as a 2 year old’s head…even if I have to raid he college fund to do it!

On Saturday we wandered around the neighbourhood. We especially love http://www.bobbetteandbelle.com/ and the little flower shop next door. We hit a French bakery for bread and spent the next hour at the playground. The evening was spent eating a cold hotdog at a baking fundraiser for kids to go to camp.  Sunday we mostly stayed home,  watching endless YouTube loops of Kitties and owls and doggies and monkey with a few Barbie Princess and Mickey Mouse cartoons thrown in for good measure.

We also baked shortbread cookies…rolling out the scraps of dough and pressing the cutters into them 100 x each. I use the easiest recipe on earth and for once she can eat the play-dough. I have posted the recipe along with a fancier version from Rouxbe. The key is to USE REAL BUTTER. This is not the cookie to skimp on the butter.

Madeline’s culinary preferences include Cheerios, macaroni, peanut butter sandwiches, crackers and cheese and scrambled eggs and toast. She also likes grapes, apple, a few bites of banana and mandarin oranges. Now I recall the reason my regular dinner making went off the rails and has yet to recover. Give me a crowd of 10 or even 50 and I am a happy to cook all day long. Make an appetizing, well-balanced meal every night is a challenge I have yet to perfect.

Joy of Baking —   Shortbread Cookies:

2 cups (260 grams) all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon (2 grams) salt

1 cup (2 sticks) (226 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature

1/2 cup (60 grams) powdered (confectioners or icing) sugar

1 teaspoon (4 grams) pure vanilla extract

 In a separate bowl whisk the flour with the salt.  Set aside.

In the bowl of your electric mixer or food processor beat the butter until smooth and creamy (about 1 minute). Add the sugar and vanilla and beat until smooth (about 2 minutes).  

Gently stir in the flour mixture just until incorporated or pulse in processor.  Flatten the dough into a disk shape, wrap in plastic wrap, and chill the dough for at least an hour or until firm.  

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (177 degrees C) with the rack in the middle of the oven.  Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

Roll out between parchment or floured surface. Cut shapes and bake until lightly browned 8-10 min. 

http://rouxbe.com/recipes/1939-lemon-filled-shortbread-cookies/text

Rouxbe On-line Cooking School from Vancouver

I discovered the ROUXBE site before I started my blog. I love it. Check out the links below and try a free lesson.
Knife Skills is a great starter. It’s a brilliant way to bring that little extra confidence around your cooking experience.
Would love to hear what you think once you try it out. Also happy to give you any insight I have around the course as well!!
xoxo terri

What is the Rouxbe Cooking School

Rouxbe is the world’s leading online cooking school that teaches cooks of any level to become better and more confident cooks.


Tour Video: Founder’s Message

Rouxbe is a different kind of cooking website

Rather than focusing exclusively on recipes, Rouxbe teaches the cooking skills and techniques behind great recipes. Using stunning close-up instructional video, practice recipes, interactive quizzes, and personalized chef feedback, Rouxbe’s 70+ online cooking classes provide professional instructional on knife skills to plating and virtually everything in between. Perhaps best of all, with Rouxbe you can now take cooking classes from your home, on your schedule, and at your own pace.


The path to becoming a better and more confident cook

Would you use a map to teach you how to drive? Probably not. Yet some people rely entirely on recipes to teach them how to cook. As with most skills, learning the fundamentals can lead to a lifetime of enjoyment and success, and cooking is not different.

By learning fundamental cooking skills and techniques, practicing with delicious recipes, and getting personalized feedback from professional chefs, you’ll quickly become a better and more confident cook. And with Rouxbe, you can do it all in your home, on your schedule, and at your own pace.


Who created the Rouxbe Cooking School?

The Rouxbe Cooking School was founded by two professional chefs in 2005 and was developed in partnership with Northwest Culinary Academy – an accredited culinary school. The Rouxbe Cooking School is now being used by home cooks, culinary training programs, and culinary professionals around the world.


How many videos does Rouxbe have?

Rouxbe has over 1,100 close-up instructional videos that capture the exact same curriculum found in professional cooking schools around the world.


How much is tuition?

Unlimited access to all content, features, and personalized chef feedback is $299.95 per year. Individual lessons are also available for $4.99 per lesson (90 days access) or $9.99 per lesson (lifetime access).


Anything Free?

To access the Rouxbe Cooking School, you need to become a paid Rouxbe student by selecting one of our tuition plans. You can access a few sample cooking school lessons and a few full step-by-step instructional video recipes on the site. However, to access 70+ online classes that include over 1,000 videos you have to join Rouxbe.